Tuesday, September 25, 2012

USED LISTS #3

TOURNAMENT chess books are finally making a comeback. I don't know if that is true of the expensive ones but we will see with this list #3.

17. The primary annotating is Georg Marco, well known for annotating in his day. This time it is for 1905, shortly after the turn of the century (the 20th). But he had help. Mieses for one. But, who were the "guys" who were in this event? The most well-known in the various events were: Alapin, von Bardeleben, Bernstein, Amos Burn, Jaowski, John, Leonhardt, Maroczy, Marshall, Mieses, Schlechter, Chigorin, Wolf, Fahrni and tons more you would hear from later such as Nimzovich, Caro, Spielmann, Przepiorka (and many more). This books is scarce as "frog hair." What's more is that it is in very nice condition in its 628 pages. One piece of paper tape at the back of the book. Sewn in signatures. Monster index. 500 annotated games. There are PHOTOS of players we have heard of but NEVER seen a picture of (such as Fahrni or Gottschall). Very clever chess diagrams, more regal than most with a kind of Frenchie flair. The famous Kieseritzky (King's Gambit) loses his KG against Bleykmans. The pages are almost new (!) There are "problems" too, you know, stuff like Mate in 3. There are 60 pages of introductory material (big in those days) because there was a lot of "thanks" to those who put up the bucks for such events. The Big Boy sponsoring this one ("protector") was Prince Dadian von Mingrelien. There is a tear on page 17 around the photo of Fritz (the old Fritz) because the binding there was a touch tight. Inside there is  a neat elliptical photo plate of Schallop, W. Paulsen, Adolf Anderssen, R. Hein, Minckwitz, AND, Zukertort at one of the worst looking chess tables and chairs in the history of chess tables and chairs. The thick dark brown binding of Der Internationale Schach-Kongress des Barmer Schach-Vereins is worth about $400.00. Perhaps you might be interested in picking up this unbelievable gem, once owned by Dale Brandreth, for a one-day only deal of $250.00.

18. That was a long description wasn't it? You will seldom see complete descriptions like this, anywhere. Just do me one favor, order this in the time slot and not later, OK? The whole purpose of this insanity is to get action now, not next week after I have already put the unsold items back into their boxes Thanks. This next one is another tournament book, 1957 Gotha. It's another international chess event with the typeset bulletins bound inside hardcovers (with some browning on the edges). There are some hot names in this one: Pachman, Uhlmann, Milic, Filip, Robatsch, Silwa, Bilke, Vasiukov, and Bronstein among others. If your guess as to who won was Bronstein then you may not need this book, but collectors would surely love it. But Pachman was no putz either as he finished a half-point behind. Nicely rendered Knight on the tan cover with red taped bindings (part of the cover). Very nice condition. Worth about $25-30. One day only price of $18.00. Naturally, just one.

19. What do people really want when they are buying older stuff? Answer, no one knows. Inexpensive would be one answer, just to have some cool older stuff that didn't cost so much. I have that. If you want something that will appreciate a heckuva lot more than that .5% CD you have, I recommend books or gold. But they have to be good books. The Barmer book is an example because it is in exceptionally fine shape. Then there is the buyer who is just looking for something good, easy to use, great condition, and not the crappy edition that was put out by RHM Press. I have that, Paul Keres' Praktische Endspiele. Gorgeous red cloth cover, almost perfect, with gilt lettering on the cover. The German words mean "Practical Endgames." A cheap German-English dictionary will get you over any bumps although if you are a decent player you will be able to figure most of them out. And here's the cherry on top of the banana split, it's in algebraic notation! When the English edition was out, I sold all the new ones and used ones I could lay my hands on. Today one in great condition would go for at least $40, but you can get this German job, one day only, for $25.00. I know this will sell,maybe two weeks from now, but I will have it listed at $40.00 then.

20. Are you one of those opening geekazoids who believe that only current opening theory which is any good is what is being pumped out right now? Funny, guys like Fischer never felt that way. In fact the books today are sanitized by computer engines and sometimes a little weak on the ideas part! Clean and often boring and not the information you are looking for. Probably the country responsible for the best chess books ever was not the Soviet Union (cheap and limited to internal information for too many years) but Germany! Even if the author was not German often the books were published in German! And then there was a case of STYLE. If the author was a strong player he often had a style. Such was a guy like GM Ludek Pachman, Czechoslovak. A while back (1956) a place called Artia published 4 volumes of opening theory which comprised a huge boatload of pages. In fact volume 1 (open and semi open games) was 520 pages back then. This hardbound has a tan cloth cover, a printed red rook on the spine. Included is a nice cloth ribbon (that was great style in the older days).  Corners slightly worn or lightly banged. The packed content inside is in wonderful shape. The thing that was so impressive about Pachman and his theory of the openings book is how ACCURATE his comments and evaluations were, for decades, top drawer. Again the German is not a big problem (unless you make it one--if you are strong enough to use this book you can figure out the German). Super clear type and diagrams. It is Moderne Schachtheorie, the title. I am sure I have the other volumes, in the rest of these books, but for now, this is it. A $35 value (and believe it, I sold many of these German ones in times past). One day only, $20.00. No, at this time I won't look up the other volumes until I run across them. The more books I sell the easier that job will be.

But I have a BONUS IDEA. Total all your purchases by the end of 2012 and the person with the highest total will be able to take a 20% DISCOUNT off of ANY unsold items I have listed at the one-day price. Over time I will have some amazing listings, hopefully 3 times a week. Eventually I will run out of time to do these things so MAKE your opportunity NOW. Keep track of your invoices because I won't be doing that for you.

Here's a couple more items before I hit the sack and by the way you must order any of these one day only items by midnight of tomorrow Sept. 26th.

21. Today a buyer reminded me of how great the book TPi published called The Risk Strategy of Leonid Stein. It was. I haven't had any in years but I do have the original Russian in the "Black" series, but Gufeld and Lazarev. It was published in 1980. It's hard to find complete sets of this Black series but this was one of the integral books. Maybe Keene meant well when he did his book on Stein but he included games by someone else so my guess is his research was rather suspect. This books is worth $25-30. The dustjacket is slightly used. I'll let this one go, One Day Only, for $15.00. Don't let this one out of your sight. 61 annotated games by the Master of Disaster (for the other guy).

22. Torquay 1982. This was a British Chess Federation event put together by the Grievson Grant. The games bulletin was put together by that great British author P.C. Griffiths. What is amazing is the high quality of these mimeographed pages. There are 307 unannotated games. Darn near everybody played in this: Levitt, Miles, A. martin, Bellin, Clarke, Kosten, Povah, Hodgson, McNab, Littlewood, Wells, Speelman and the list goes on. How often do you see A. Martin in Bulletins (and in this one he drew with Hodgson) excellent condition? This is worth $15 or more and I have one for $9.00.

23. How would you like a book which came from the chess library of Hans Berliner? It's in 2-color and in 3-D pictures. The photography is excellent. The covers show that the book was used sometimes. The arrows and diagrams are totally useful. At last one of the few books which a person new to chess could actually learn from! It has an non-ostentatious title: The Easiest Way to Learn Chess. Can you imagine the world's postal chess champ using this book for probably a grandkid or maybe one of his own? This book was published by Simon & Schuster in 1960 and you won't guess the name of the author! Fred Reinfeld. Don't be surprised, old Freddy knew more about chessbook salesman ship than many of the editors and marketing gurus out there today. Fred sold multi-zillions of books and not just on chess. The pictured pieces are from the famous Craftsman set! And here is the biggie that Bobby Fischer also used--NO chess notation! There's a crease on the back cover and a couple other pages. In excellent condition this would sell for $20.00. For one day only, I will sell this for TEN BUCKS.

24. This next one is a REAL collectible for ONE particular reason: for many of us, including myself, this was one of the first books I ever owned--and one of the first books I actually got into! It's another Fred Reinfeld book (NOT Renfield)! It is a Barnes & Noble book ad was published in 1955 by Sterling (who is still around). This book was $1.25 back then! Believe it or not it's about a $10 book (the hardcover is about 3 times that). But, today only, $5.00. It was 1001 Ways to Checkmate.

Okay, that's it for now. Hope you find something cool to get. EIGHT items.

Contact me at bob@thinkerspressinc.com to reserve yours. Must be paid for within 7 days (or if I have your credit card info (or  you can use PayPal) we can take care of it immediately. Postage is a little extra. If it's a bigger item, say over $50 I have to insure it. You can call (make it brief please, as John H. said to me this afternoon, "Man, you are on fire!") It's true. 563-271-6657.

Not responsible to meet prices based on typographical errors. You see something cool? Don't put it off. You'll kick yourself.

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